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blacklabelreview: Music, Movie, Cars, Books, technology, fashion, Prom & Quincenera Dresses Reviews, Press Release
Wednesday, 29 March 2006
Immigration Issues: Homebuilding, Agricultural Work, Insulation and More
Topic: Immigration/Travel Issues

Illegal immigrants are found in all sectors of the national industry. From the high-tech industries to the agricultural industries, illegal immigrants can be found toiling to keep our economy going. According to the Pew research, they are mostly concentrated in construction, agriculture and cleaning jobs. They are taking jobs that Americans won't take. Even poor Americans and those who are on welfare stay away from these jobs. Who will harvest the beautiful, fresh nectarines, prunes, plums, peaches from the orchards of the San Joaquin Valley? Who will pick the tomatos from the large fields of Florida? Who will harvest the apples from the apple orchards of Washington State? Who will work on our homes as insulation workers? Who will work as agricultural workers? It is estimated that illegal workers make 5% of the U.S. labor force.

In the meantime, we are seeking to sell our houses built by the hands and sweat of immigrants. We are worried because there is a cool down. We see our neighbors who are trying to beat each other to place their homes on the market first. Everywhere you turn, you see a for sale sign. Houses are taking longer to sell. More worry sets in. The house has been on the market for many weeks. The agents have long stopped bringing interested customers. Yet, he or she is still in the picture because of the contract. The weather does not want to warm up yet. Everybody is waiting for Spring, the high season of home shopping. Home prices in the Central San Joaquin Valley are half the state median. That provides many families with incentives to relocate to the Greater Valley areas. From Sacramento and nearby cities to Fresno-Clovis areas, more and more new faces are buying homes. Farmers are selling out. The money is hot. They want to leave behind the unpredictability that comes with agriculture. They want to take the money investors and developers are rubbing on their face, a large sum per acre. There is reason to worry. Interest rates are going up. Prices of existing homes in some key communities are going down. And the number of building permits for residential housing in the Valley is going down. Many industry insiders are saying that it is time that prices settle down a bit.

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Posted by Fashionista Shopping Analyst at 11:46 PM PST
Updated: Saturday, 1 April 2006 8:33 PM PST
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